Category Archives: Training

All the articles about training – physical and mental – to be the best climber I can be.

The ten things I wish I’d known before climbing in Northern Thailand

No advice can really prepare you for rock climbing in a tropical country when you’re used to the mild European climate, but I wish I’d done a little more research about what it’s like to climb in Thailand.

We’ve been climbing at Crazy Horse for six days now (with a two-day break when we went back to Chiang Mai for the weekend).

To be honest, it’s been a whole lot better than I expected. The rock is beautiful and not too polished, the routes are interesting and incredibly well-bolted. The grades are maybe a little soft, but the heat and humidity makes everything seem so much harder.

There is a good variety of relatively burly, short routes, and long sweat-fests with technical cruxes interspersed with easier face climbing. And we haven’t even been to the Heart Wall yet, which is meant to be spectacular!

But it certainty takes a bit of research to have the best time here and to be comfortable at the crag. Here are a few things I wish I’d known before we came here.

1. It’s really easy to get to the crag on public transport. We only found this out when we spoke to other climbers at the homestay where we are living, and I only found one blog about this after a bit of searching. Most of the information online is produced by Chiang Mai Rock Climbing Adventures (CMRCA), which can organise return transfers to and from the crag, but these cost 525 baht per person (around £12, which I know doesn’t sound like a lot, but it is by Thai standards). Public transport costs 40 baht one way!

2. It is absolutely essential to bring a lighter and anti-mosquito coils to burn at the crag. It gets pretty mosquito-heavy among all the vegetation, and the coils seem to be the only thing they are afraid of. I had actually thought of bringing the coils, but stupidly we didn’t have a lighter for the first few days, and you kind of need both! We finally got one back in Chiang Mai.

3. Bring more quickdraws with you than you think you could ever use. Many routes are up to 30 metres long and extremely well-bolted. We had 18 with us, and we’ve used almost all of them on some routes, and there are apparently some longer ones that may even require more.

4. Chiang Mai is not worth spending a weekend in. It has become far too Westernised and touristy, and one day would have been plenty. It was worth going back to do some laundry and to get some Thai massages (which are amazing!!), and for the weekend food markets. But it isn’t a great rest day. It’s quite busy and more expensive, and it’s hard to find a nice room at short notice as there is so much demand.

5. The heat and humidity take a LOT of getting used to, so choose your crag wisely. Some of them get much hotter than others, and climbing in 30 degree heat and mad humidity is not for the faint of heart. Expect to sweat as much as you would in a hot yoga class, but all day long.

6. Bring a towel to the crag. Or two. For reasons see my point above…

7. Bring a lot of extra chalk. See point 5.

8. It’s worth buying some fruit back in Chiang Mai or at the market down the road from the homestay, because the place itself, though it does great food, doesn’t sell any fruit. And if you’re like me, you will want nothing but fruit and cold drinks in this heat!

9. It’s worth bringing head torches with you when going out to the crags. There are a lot of caves around, some of which have bolted routes inside them, but it’s quite dark in there.

10. November is a very busy time here, as it’s high season, but the longer you stay at the homestay the more likely you are to get a nice room, as one of the longer-term customers. We stayed in a tent for the first 4 nights, and then had to sleep in a dorm for a night when we returned from Chiang Mai. But the next day, someone left, so we got a huge double room, with a toilet, a (cold) shower and a fridge, for not much more money than we were paying for a tent!

Thailand: Climbing in Chiang Mai

After a few days of eating everything Thailand has to offer and accumulating some substantial podge around our mid areas, we finally made it to the climbing area in Chiang Mai.

Situated in the North of the country, Chiang Mai has unfortunately become far more touristy than when I last visited Thailand a decade ago. The climbing has also now been discovered by more than just a handful of foreigners, but it is still nowhere near as popular as some of the more well known destinations, such as Krabi in the South of the country.

And as the first place to begin our rock climbing adventure, it is absolutely perfect, with a huge range of easier climbs, and a wonderful change from the hustle and bustle of the cities.

The climbing area, called Crazy Horse, sits around 45 mins drive outside of Chiang Mai. We couldn’t get our hands on a guidebook in England, so we bought it when we got here from a company called Chiang Mai Rock Climbing Adventures (CMRCA), which looks after the crags.

CMRCA shop
CMRCA shop

They run a gym in the city, through which people can book climbing courses or transport to and from the crag. We used their service to get out to Crazy Horse, though by Thai standards it’s pretty expensive – around £12 each (525 baht), return.

We were also recommended to stay at a place near the crag called Jira Homestay, but it turned out November is a busy month and they had run out of rooms. Instead, we were offered a tent, which was completely set up for us when we arrived and turned out to be a really nice place to spend the night. And we paid…just 250 baht per night for this. A whopping £6 for the two of us!

They also do amazing food. It comes at slightly  higher  prices  than some  of the food markets, but the portions  are huge! And they prepare  lunches  to take away to the crag  too, which is  awesome!

We’ve mostly done very easy climbing so far, but that is exactly the start we needed. Even the easy routes are very interesting, with lots of features, and extremely well bolted!

The heat and humidity have got to us though, and we have struggled a bit with stamina, and general breathing throughout the day. But apparently it’s actually pretty cool now, so we better acclimatise fast for when it gets hotter again…

Can’t wait to check out more areas over the next few days. We have recommendations from a few people for an easy multi-pitch with breathtaking views, so that’s definitely on the bucket list.

The benefits of mindfulness for climbing

A mindfulness practice for me usually looks like this: lie down; begin meditation; try to focus on my breath for a bit; think about something else; do a bit more focused breathing; wake up half an hour later, confused about how I managed to fall asleep.

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photo by: priyam.n

Tantrums and tears: Dealing with failure in climbing

Those of us who are seriously addicted to this climbing thing will know the desperate frustration of failure on a route we have psyched ourselves up to send, and many will have experienced the resulting tantrums. Sometimes I feel like a spoilt child who has been denied sweets before lunchtime – stomping feet, tears and all.

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Climbing in Northern Spain: Destination guide

‘Wow! A lifetime would not be enough to climb all the rock in this place!!’ – that was my thought when I first arrived in Asturias, a region in the North-West of Spain, in June this year. I have now just come back from a second trip, and I want more already!!!

Asturias
Entrago in Asturias

My love affair with Asturias dates back to a day in mid-May when I was googling somewhere cheap to fly to in Spain at relatively short notice, to climb, of course. I stumbled upon Asturias on skyscanner.com. The flights were cheap! Even for the May bank holiday weekend, the return tickets were barely over £100. ‘I wonder if there is any climbing there?’ I thought to myself, so I looked around and came upon this article on UKC…and I knew straight away I had found something pretty damn special!

Continue reading Climbing in Northern Spain: Destination guide